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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everybody, I just got my first 4x4 a 1980 Ford Bronco (stock). I would like to start 4 wheeling once every weekend; But I have no idea of what kind of maintanence I should do to keep it running!. Like how often I should grease parts etc. Also would you get a body lift first or a suspension lift?. Also my vehicle has some rust what is a good way to get rid of it?. Any suggestions would help-Thanks for your time.

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81 Bronco-Stock (for now)
 

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Start with the basics. Go over your vehicle thoroughly and make sure it is ready for the trail. Service the diffs, transfer case and tranny. Make sure you battery is secure and in good condition. Make sure the charging and starting system are in good working order. Make sure you have good brakes and a functional park brake. Check all lights and make sure the wipers/washers work. Check all U-joints and ensure the 4x4 system works and you know how to use it. Try the transfer case in all ranges. Check all the tires including the spare, make sure they are in good shape and all the same size. How about the jack and spare tire equipment, these should be tried to see if they actually work.

Once you have all this stuff covered you will be very familar with your vehicle and can identify what has failed if something happens out on the trail. It is much easier to wheel when you know that your rig is in good shape , then you can concentrate on the trail. Nothing sucks more than having to fix something that was very easy to cure at home but now is burried in goo etc.. Do not scrimp on the basics as everyone here can tell tales of the little things that jumped up and bit them in the ass. Lets go wheeling some time.

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Me Tarzan u ? Favorite tool?
Monkey wrench!
I am the original shade tree mechanic

[This message has been edited by Tarzan (edited November 14, 2001).]
 

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Like Tarzan said!

Once you get to wheeling grease everything every time you submerge the axles in water or play in mud. Also check all fluids for water contamination after every dunking.

A body lift fits bigger tires, but a suspension lift should give you more wheel travel. More wheel travel means more chance of keeping all 4 tires on the ground, which means more traction and less chance of being stuck.
If your rig has original springs they are probably near dead anyway, and your shocks might be near death as well, so if you have the cash start with a modest suspension lift with all new springs and shocks. You will have to find people who know your rig to find out how much lift you can do without adversly affecting drive shaft angles, steering geometry, and similar "side effects".


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Chris S.
2002 KJ - staying stock (almost)
2000 TJ - 2" suspension lift, 1/2" body lift, assorted skids, hooks, rock rails, rock lights, 33" BFG MTs, custom bumper, Warn 8274
Mud Puppy's Jeep site
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok, Thanks for the info. Also when I'm checking the U-joints what should I look for to know that I have to replace them?. I'm not mechanically inclined so please bear with me!. Thank You.

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81 Bronco-Stock (for now)
 

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Originally posted by RevMan:
Ok, Thanks for the info. Also when I'm checking the U-joints what should I look for to know that I have to replace them?. I'm not mechanically inclined so please bear with me!. Thank You.


the drive shaft u-joints are easy. Just grab the drive shaft and try to wiggle it. If there is any play in the u-joint it needs to be replaced. I have u-joints for steering joints as well and I was able to tell they needed replacing when I took it apare and they disintegrated in my hands
. I'm not sure if you have CV joints for steering, or u-joints. Can someone else answer the question for the steering u-joints(axle u-joints/CV-joints)?

Is your bronco full size or the bronco II?(was the bII made then?)

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1974 Dodge W100 Power Wagon
Looks beaten up but it's fun.
Slowly becoming less original, 31" tires, 360 2bbl V8, TF727 3 speed auto, NP205 T-case Dana 44 front, Chrysler 8 3/4" rear with detroit locker

[This message has been edited by Jarett (edited November 15, 2001).]
 

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Originally posted by RevMan:
I have the fullsize bronco


Very nice. I almost bought one. It sold 5 minutes before I got there to buy it. You will have lots of fun with it.

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1974 Dodge W100 Power Wagon
Looks beaten up but it's fun.
Slowly becoming less original, 31" tires, 360 2bbl V8, TF727 3 speed auto, NP205 T-case Dana 44 front, Chrysler 8 3/4" rear with detroit locker
 

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You can also tell if u joint failure is happening if you find orange rust colored powder around the yoke. Sometimes the joints are siezed and show no play but if the shaft was pulled off the vehicle you would find the suspect joint bound up (very common on GM's).

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Me Tarzan u ? Favorite tool?
Monkey wrench!
I am the original shade tree mechanic
 

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One of the first things you should buy for your truck is a Chiltons, or similar guide/repair book. They are very helpfull. You will find that you can do more work your self and save a lot of money on labor

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1974 Dodge W100 Power Wagon
Looks beaten up but it's fun.
Slowly becoming less original, 31" tires, 360 2bbl V8, TF727 3 speed auto, NP205 T-case Dana 44 front, Chrysler 8 3/4" rear with detroit locker
 
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