BC 4x4 Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
'lo all,

Been getting technical lately and this is kind of a technical question...

Would you want to lighten the flywheel in a samurai if using the stock engine??? When I was quasi-racing, lightening the flywheel in my 1.6L MR2 was a good idea as it enabled me to climb the revs faster.

So, this would seem to be a good idea for engines which produce their power at higher revs in general... but is it a good idea for the Sammi when used off road but also as a daily driver???

Conversely, I knew a number of drag racers who used heavier flywheels... would you want to do that in a Sammi????

Bench racer response more than welcome


David

------------------
Veni, Vedi, Velcro...
I came, I saw, I stuck around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Originally posted by David:
Conversely, I knew a number of drag racers who used heavier flywheels... would you want to do that in a Sammi????
Tri County Gear apparently does this with Jeep 4cyl motors too. The heavier flywheel will smooth out the motor and make it harder to stall. Better bottom end grunt but less willing to rev.

Jon

------------------
Jon B.
'82 CJ7 Some mods.
 

·
webwheeling...
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
Ask Rhys about light flywheels!
rev, rev, stall, start, rev, rev, stall.
Only lighten it if you are only into mud. For anything else you need low end torque which a heavier 'wheel will help keep the motor spinning.


------------------
Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
probably it would be a lose/lose situation? lighter flywheels on motorcycle engines are usually oriented towards higher reving with not as much torque effect because they want to stay high up in the powerband and use gears to stay there.
because of the fairly awesome power to weight ratio low bottom end "oomph" isn't as critical.
but notice i said "usually". all things are never equal...heavier flywheeled twins can spank buzzy the humming bird inline fours in many instances.
enter the lose/lose part:my sammy doesn't have the guts to fight it's way out of a wet paper bag-having it rev just that tiny little bit faster (theorectically) wouldn't make it my friend in low speed stuff i'm sure,others may disagree but i don't like to rev the living bags off of my wee little hampster.it doesn't make enough power down low to make me want to lose even the tiniest hint of bottom end,and it sure doesn't make power in the higher rev bracket either,so having it rev out to "out of breath" just faster.....
wouldn't it be cool to put a Hayabusa engine or a Vmax in a sammy


------------------
A.K.A. uzi9mm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
412 Posts
and before you say "idiot" putting a bike engine in
A:i already know i am one,so there
B:i have seen an inline 12 (yes that's right)in a "le car" based kit machine once....2 kawasaki 6 cylinder watercooled kz 1300 engines. with two turbos if recollect properly. was putting out something like 500 hp. easy.

------------------
A.K.A. uzi9mm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
If you want a lighter flywheel use a Swift or Sprint FWD flywheel I did this by mistake once the clutch disc won't work ( splines ) but the the rest of it will.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Originally posted by David:
'lo all,

Been getting technical lately and this is kind of a technical question...

Would you want to lighten the flywheel in a samurai if using the stock engine??? When I was quasi-racing, lightening the flywheel in my 1.6L MR2 was a good idea as it enabled me to climb the revs faster.

So, this would seem to be a good idea for engines which produce their power at higher revs in general... but is it a good idea for the Sammi when used off road but also as a daily driver???

Conversely, I knew a number of drag racers who used heavier flywheels... would you want to do that in a Sammi????

Bench racer response more than
David

Flywheel basically works as a "torque accumulator". If you make it lighter, the engine will rev up faster, but you will find out that to move from a dead stop you will need to kick it harder.
If you do the opposite, your starts will be easier and engine smoother.

Bottom line: IMHO unless your engine has enough power that you shift every second, I wouldn't bother machinning down the flywheel. For an off-road use (especially rock-crawling) you would like to have an extra spinning weight behind the block. A spinning weight doesn't really affect the bearing loads unless your engine is totally out of balance.
Just my theoretical .02

------------------
-marker

[This message has been edited by marker (edited August 23, 2001).]
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top