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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Quick repair question, suggestions if you will...

I have a few holes in the floor of my XJ, and was wondering what the masses do for this type of repair? It is nothing that affects the structural integrity or anything, but makes for some wet floors in the rain and I would like to take care of it before winter really hits. A couple of the holes are about 2 inches in diameter with weakening around the immediate area, so would probably be cutting out a bigger area for a proper fix. Please let me know the best way to go about this, here are the main tools I have immediately at my disposal;

Angle Grinder
Hacksaw
Sheet metal snips
Every wrench known to man
gasket making products
And a few other hand tools (nothing in the way of bigger cutters/welders etc...)

I have read a few posts where people have mentioned replacing the floor because they wanted it thicker or what-not, but never saw details as to a good way to get it done.

Tips?

Thanks!

D.
 

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My dad once spent 2 years re-building two 500lbs huge old tig welders to fix the floor in his old Ford van...


When he finally got the welders going he pop-riveted the floor in.....

Without a welder I would get some panel bounding glue. and glue and rivet the new floor in (cut the old out with the grinder first). Paint and done....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Would the glue be from Lordco, or...?

I happen to have the tools for going the rivet route, good call.

Will the glue act as a good sealant for preventing air leakage, or do you think I should make a gasket around it as well?

Thanks,

D.
 

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get some fibreglass mat. just put 3 layers down and give it a good coat of undercoat underneath. quick, easy, and cheap to do, even over and over and over, cause without cutting it out, welding in new metal and sealing out the elements its just going to get worse and worse.
 

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I had good luck patching a couple holes in the floor of my old bronco II with some aluminum sheet metal and pop rivets and sealing the edges with JB weld. I just cut out all the cancerous rusty steel and made a patch that over lapped the edges of the hole by about an inch all the way around. Once the epoxy set I sprayed the inside and outside of the repair with some rattle can spray on rocker guard. It worked great and never had any issues with the leaks returning.
 

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Don't screw around doing it the bojang rednecked way. Do it right the first time and cut the shit out, flange it and weld new steel in. Fiberglass on steel does not expand and contract at the same rate under heat or cold weather and will seperate. Pop rivets are aluminum and will vibrate loose and fail or corrode do to disimilar metal corrosion and fall out. Doing it the right way will add to the value of your vehicle and it will last a long time without having to worry about it.
 

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seam sealer and panel bond are differant products,panel bond is a glue type product and is used in bonding body panels together in the factory INSTEAD of welding. after using panel bond, then use seam sealer around the seam to stop water penetration.
If you go with pop type rivets buy steel rivets NOT aluminum! again use seam sealer no matter what fix you go with. hope this helps.
 

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seam sealer and panel bond are differant products,panel bond is a glue type product and is used in bonding body panels together in the factory INSTEAD of welding. after using panel bond, then use seam sealer around the seam to stop water penetration.
If you go with pop type rivets buy steel rivets NOT aluminum! again use seam sealer no matter what fix you go with. hope this helps.
Show me a floor that's held in with only glue from the factory and I'll show you a 19 year old virgin Surrey girl.
 

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i am sticking to the topic, learn to read. thedjjack said use panel bond,not me i simply stated what it is used for.
 

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if you are wanting an easy fix that you can do with the tools you list then i would suggest you cut the rust out, cut your panel bigger than the opening pre drill holes for rivets and lay a good bead of seam sealer down then after riveting the panel in place seam seal the rivets and seams inside and out. this fix would last you for years (oh don't forget the primer and paint). cutting and welding is the best but you don't list a mig or tig in your tool box. rivets have been used in the aircraft industry for years (i know they don't use the same pop rivets but his floor will never see flight either!) as stated before i hope this helps
 

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if you are wanting an easy fix that you can do with the tools you list then i would suggest you cut the rust out, cut your panel bigger than the opening pre drill holes for rivets and lay a good bead of seam sealer down then after riveting the panel in place seam seal the rivets and seams inside and out. this fix would last you for years (oh don't forget the primer and paint). cutting and welding is the best but you don't list a mig or tig in your tool box. rivets have been used in the aircraft industry for years (i know they don't use the same pop rivets but his floor will never see flight either!) as stated before i hope this helps
Exactly...This is an XJ so can you add value fixing the rust with a welder...not exactly a classic (yet)....

The OP gave the tools he/she had and this is the easiest way to patch it up...
 

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Don't screw around doing it the bojang red-necked way. Do it right the first time and cut the shit out, flange it and weld new steel in. Fiberglass on steel does not expand and contract at the same rate under heat or cold weather and will separate. Pop rivets are aluminum and will vibrate loose and fail or corrode do to dissimilar metal corrosion and fall out. Doing it the right way will add to the value of your vehicle and it will last a long time without having to worry about it.
Wish I knew the same doing a window patch replace with fiberglass about 15 years ago. Fiberglass cracked in the heat of summer and undid all my hard work.

I now have a mig to do my work and just did some long painful wheel repairs for my rig. I think if I did it again, I would not use cleekoes "only for strait metal" and instead, use small bolts and nuts to wheel well patch together. Strait metal is a piece of cake...wheel wells..NOT!
 

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panel bonder is great stuff .. I use 3M all the time ... and it's better then a weld !! (for bonding panels) ICBC even came down hard on some body shops for "epoxying" instead of welding because of the time savings .. it's great stuff , and 3M garentees the bond for LIFE !!
setting in a floor piece , would much like be installing a panel .. it's not structural (unless it's a mount point) so It could be done , if done right .

personally , I wouldnt do it though , as I have the tools to actually make and replace the floor .. so this is what I would do


.
 

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Duct tape and roofing tar, lay the carpet back down and tell your passengers to step carefully... especially during water crossings :) LR
 

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Have the carpet pulled back or removed, have your patch pieces ready to go and numbered, and go to an exhaust shop and give them $20 or a case of beer or whatever. Take it home and bedliner the patches
 

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Best idea I have heard yet. Beats doing it half ass.
Ya, exhaust shop welders are known for their great welds...Glue and rivets will be better then a $20.00 job....

They do not weld planes together anymore due to glue and rivets being more predictable....It is a few little patches....not structure. Plus you can buy some good quality rivets...
 
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