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I have a 1991 jeep yj with 31 inch tires. i was thinking about getting a locker. i use my jeep quite a bit for off roading, but nothing hard core, mostly mud and trails at stave. i was wondering because i put a lot of Km's on road should i put the locker on the front wheels? that way there won't be any loud sounds or a chance i break somthing in the rear. would a locker in the front be at a disadvantage compared to a rear locker?
I drive on the highway at high speeds, would that be hard on a rear locker?
Whats the pro's and cons?
Thanks
Graham
 

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hey Graham

Well if you wheel enough you'll know the time when you need most tractrion is when your facing up a mucky slop with rain falling by the gallon, so once you start your Jeep up that slope all the vehicles weight is on the rear axle. So what I'm trying to say is if I were you I would do the rear end first.

Jason

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1990 YJ. Lots O'Fun
[email protected]
 

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If you get one, DEFINATELY do the rear first. A locker is for some serious wheel'n. A front locker is for the rigs that don't know what pavement is.

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Play hard + Rest easy
Drive a Jeep
'92 YJ
 

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In the rocks a front locker will help climb the front end up onto obsticals that you simply couldn't climb with a rear locker.

On slippery mud hill climbs the rear has the most weight so the locker can give the best bite.



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Chris S.
2002 KJ - staying stock (almost)
2000 TJ - 2" suspension lift, 1/2" body lift, assorted skids, hooks, rock rails, rock lights, 33" BFG MTs, custom bumper, Warn 8274
Mud Puppy's Jeep site
 

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I recently put a detroit locker in my rear dif, and I have not noticed any loud noises. There is the odd click, but nothing anoying. The only time I have found the locker anoying is in really tight turns, where I end up plowing my front tires (U-turn), or when I punch the gas hard when taking a corner, and it locks up.
As far as I know highway speeds don't harm a locker.

It makes a huge difference on the trail. I don't need 4x4 nearly as much. If you were to put a locker in a 2 weel drive turck it could go almost as far as a 4x4 with limated slip.

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1974 Dodge W100 Power Wagon
Looks beaten up but it's fun.
Slowly becoming less original, 31" tires, 360 2bbl V8, TF727 3 speed auto, NP205 T-case Dana 44 front, Chrysler 8 3/4" rear with detroit locker
 

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Originally posted by Graham:
but what about on flat fields of mud? like at stave? would a front lock be best?
how do lockers drive on the street or highway?
I have not noticed much difference with street driving. Like I said before. the only time I notice the locker is when I punch the gas when making a corner, an dI break the inside tire loose, or when I make U-turns, and end up plowing my fron tires. The noises from lockers are minimal.

My experience with lockers is limated, as I have only had one for a month, but from what I have heard, you sould put one in the rear first. It will allow you to do more things. There are lots of hills on BC trails, and they are often wet and muddy, so you really want a rear locker. As for flat mud. I don't know. I have never had my truck in deep mud before, but hopefully I will be at Stave lake on Sunday.

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1974 Dodge W100 Power Wagon
Looks beaten up but it's fun.
Slowly becoming less original, 31" tires, 360 2bbl V8, TF727 3 speed auto, NP205 T-case Dana 44 front, Chrysler 8 3/4" rear with detroit locker
 

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You might want to consider an electric or air locker instead of a locker like a detroit. That way you have full control over wether it is engaged or not. They are much more expensive, but the bonus with air lockers, is you get an onboard air supply. I have been told that with a small take, the ARB compressor is enough to power air tools.

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1974 Dodge W100 Power Wagon
Looks beaten up but it's fun.
Slowly becoming less original, 31" tires, 360 2bbl V8, TF727 3 speed auto, NP205 T-case Dana 44 front, Chrysler 8 3/4" rear with detroit locker
 

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Superfly
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I'm not purposely trying to start an argument today but... ;-)

I've watched ARB compressors used to for airing up tires and they're very slow, as slow as any compressor with a small motor. I can't see them being used for running power tools, especially in light of the tiny air tank (about the size of a large pop can) they come with. I suppose if you plumb it to a large tank, then you could run air tools. But then the compressor would be running for quite a while to build up the pressure. I would expect this to exceed the compressor's duty cycle.

I've heard the comparison btwn a 2WD with a locker and an open-diff 4WD before but it doesn't hold water. A locker will definitely improve a 2WD's performance but it will never equal an open diff 4WD because if the terrain is providing similar amounts of resistive torque to all four tires, the 4WD will have true 4WD where as the 2WD will only ever have 2WD. At the worst case, the 4WD will have only 2 driven wheels, as would the 2WD in all cases. So, the edge definitely goes to the 4WD system.

I'm sure there are some specific situations where a locked 2WD would have the advantage but they're far and few between.

...lars



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19911995409993004:144444.103512.58274



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Originally posted by lars:
I'm not purposely trying to start an argument today but... ;-)

I've watched ARB compressors used to for airing up tires and they're very slow, as slow as any compressor with a small motor. I can't see them being used for running power tools, especially in light of the tiny air tank (about the size of a large pop can) they come with. I suppose if you plumb it to a large tank, then you could run air tools. But then the compressor would be running for quite a while to build up the pressure. I would expect this to exceed the compressor's duty cycle.

I've heard the comparison btwn a 2WD with a locker and an open-diff 4WD before but it doesn't hold water. A locker will definitely improve a 2WD's performance but it will never equal an open diff 4WD because if the terrain is providing similar amounts of resistive torque to all four tires, the 4WD will have true 4WD where as the 2WD will only ever have 2WD. At the worst case, the 4WD will have only 2 driven wheels, as would the 2WD in all cases. So, the edge definitely goes to the 4WD system.

I'm sure there are some specific situations where a locked 2WD would have the advantage but they're far and few between.

...lars


As for the ARB compressor. Yes you would need to use a larger that stock tank, and it would only be good for emergency repairs like changing a flat tire.

As for the locked 2WD vs 4x4. I stand corected


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1974 Dodge W100 Power Wagon
Looks beaten up but it's fun.
Slowly becoming less original, 31" tires, 360 2bbl V8, TF727 3 speed auto, NP205 T-case Dana 44 front, Chrysler 8 3/4" rear with detroit locker
 

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Hey lars, are there any other compressor out there that would fill a tire quickly and still be used for the ARB air locker.

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Play hard + Rest easy
Drive a Jeep
'92 YJ
 

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Originally posted by OptBlackNite:
Hey lars, are there any other compressor out there that would fill a tire quickly and still be used for the ARB air locker.
Someone please correct me if I am wrong


As far as I know any compressor can be used with the ARB locker.

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1974 Dodge W100 Power Wagon
Looks beaten up but it's fun.
Slowly becoming less original, 31" tires, 360 2bbl V8, TF727 3 speed auto, NP205 T-case Dana 44 front, Chrysler 8 3/4" rear with detroit locker
 

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AFAIK in order for an ARB locker to engage it has to have a constant 90 or 100 psi when wheeling (To engage the locker). So your not going to be using your ARB's when your pulled over on the side of the trail fixing something.
So If you can switch it some how to be able to use the compressor with a small tank I don't see why it can't be used for trail side repairs and airing up tires.

Mind you I may be wrong because I don't own an ARB but I have many friends who do. And I will say that some preffer to use thier York over thier ARB for airing up and repairs.

here we go , I don't know if this helps but from the catlog
currant draw : no load 9 amps
full load 20 amps
Flow rate: 24 liters/minute at 200kpa (29psi)
Preasure switch: open 690kpa (100psi)
closed 585kpa (85psi)

Also a tire inflation kit is available with the ARB compressor.

Jason

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1990 YJ. Lots O'Fun
[email protected]
 

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Superfly
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Originally posted by Jarett:
Someone please correct me if I am wrong

As far as I know any compressor can be used with the ARB locker.
WRONG! You see...ok, you're right.


IBJeepin wrote:
AFAIK in order for an ARB locker to engage it has to have a constant 90 or 100 psi when wheeling (To engage the locker). So your not going to be using your ARB's when your pulled over on the side of the trail fixing something.
Hmm...I think you'd be in danger of blowing out the seal in the ARB. If I recall correctly, the ARB actually needs somewhere in the neighbourhood of 20-40 psi. That's why people who run a non ARB compressor have to use a pressure regulator to reduce the tank pressure (which is usually at around 115 psi or so) before running the line to the ARB air valve. In fact, I think the ARB compressor also has a regulator built into one output valve which goes to the air valves, and a second unregulated one for an air hose. I'm not quite sure about that, though.


...lars

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I was under the impression they needed more like 90 psi as well. One of the guys in my club (Coastal Cruisers) uses a homemade "powertank" with a regulator to run his ARB.
--
Norm
'85 BJ70
 

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Larry you are way off. Can I try some of that glue you've been sniffing? ARB recommends 85-105 psi. They say absolutely no more than 105. I have seen them run on as low as 60 but I'm not sure how low of a pressure they will work on.

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Paul Gagnon
Burnaby, B.C.
"No Brain, No Pain"
A page from my book.

Jeeps don't have "things"

[This message has been edited by Paul (edited September 22, 2001).]
 

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Originally posted by Paul:
Larry you are way off. Can I try some of that glue you've been sniffing? ARB recommends 85-105 psi. They say absolutely no more than 105. I have seen them run on as low as 60 but I'm not sure how low of a pressure they will work on.
Oh, ok, I stand corrected. Hmm...I recall reading in one of those Turtle Expedition articles about how they how to reduce the pressure from their main tank to supply the Air Lockers and I thought for sure it was in the 40 psi range.

Never mind. :)


...lars



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Lars,

What do all those numbers meas in your signature?
19911995409993004:144444.103512.58274


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1974 Dodge W100 Power Wagon
Looks beaten up but it's fun.
Slowly becoming less original, 31" tires, 360 2bbl V8, TF727 3 speed auto, NP205 T-case Dana 44 front, Chrysler 8 3/4" rear with detroit locker
 

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Its a secret....if he tells you he has to kill you.


And umm well jerett we've kinda grown to like you and your truck and your postings. so Please don't join the hundreds who have asked (God bless thier souls).

Hope I've aided in avoiding another (hey Lars what are all those numbers) Death.

A caring wheeler
Jason

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1990 YJ. Lots O'Fun
[email protected]
 
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