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What is good solution to the typical toyota rear end sag problem. My leaf-srings are flat and I was thinking of re-arching them with an add a leaf. Anyone tried this set up. What works best.
Thanks,

BigRig
 

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Truck or Land Cruiser?

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75 FJ40, 4 inch BDS springs, 1inch body, 35's, detroit EZ locker, power steering, disc brakes, 3spd low range gears, full cage, XD9000i, extended shackles, dual batteries....you get the idea.
 

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I had my front re-arched with add-a-leafs and they worked pretty well except I dont get as much flex out of them. Iam sure with doing the back instead of the front the amount of flex wouldent matter as much and you wouldent notice it. Get them re-arched and about 2/3 inches added in add-a-leafs(cheap lift)and you will be happy. Do that or keep your eye out for a cheap susp lift for sale-check on here or in the buy&sell.
Brett


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85 Yota- 33 inch Thornbirds,3 inch trailmaster susp lift, smittybuilt bush bar,roll bar,8 offroad lights,insane pioneer stereo with 2 JL-10 inch subs in custom box,K&N air,new engine and of course a good'ol CB radio
-TRUCKS ARE MEANT TO BE RAISED NOT LOWERED-
 

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You have several options.

Replace the springs with new springs. This is the most expensive way to go, but you can get a nice, flexible set of springs that have a slight lift built in to them to eliminate the butt-sagg look, allow for some increased load-carrying capacity, and increase articulation. Lift springs are slightly longer than stock, to make up for the increased arc; this allows the rear shackle to be positioned correctly for optimum ride quality.

Lift shackles. Longer shackles will provide a larger arc, which in theory will give you more droop and compression. They are usually stronger than stock, but they will not increase your load-carrying capacity. Eventually you'll want to replace the springs, and you'll be able to use the lift shackles with the new springs.

Add-a-leaves. They are sharply arched, and work by applying upward pressure to the other leaves to gain lift. They will firm up the ride and reduce the articulation, and short add-a-leaves apply pressure to the main leaves between the axle and the eyes, and can cause the main leaves to break prematurely. Building in lift with stock springs causes the springs to be shorter than stock due to the increased arc, which places the shackles too far forward, reducing droop and ride quality. Short add-a-leaves get broken frequently. If you are getting add-a-leaves, get the full-length versions. Load-carrying capacity is increased at the expense of ride quality.

Re-arching stock springs. Ideally, you'll want to arch them higher than they were originally, which will give you a slight rake, which will not only solve the butt-sag but will allow the truck to sit fairly level when loaded. However, re-arching sagged springs will only work for a while, then they'll sag back down again. Plus, if they are arched higher than stock, they become too short due to the increased arc, and your shackle gets positioned too far forward, which reduces droop and increases ride harshness.

Lift blocks. They can be ordered for whatever height increase you need. They will increase axle wrap and will require longer U-bolts, which is a weak link. Your ride quality and load-carrying capacity are not changed. Very inexpensive. They have been known to get spit out on the trail.

Obviously you can combine ideas, but you'll also be adding all of the bad traits together. The best solution for a rig that will be four-wheeled is a new set of lift springs.

If you want to do some custom work, there are a few other choices; it all depends on how much work, time, and money you want to spend.

You can replace the rear springs with springs from another vehicle; the hot swap these days are '88-series Chevy 1/2-ton springs, which are a lot longer than stock Toyota springs and will require welding a new spring perch and bolting a Chevy shackle to your Toyota shackle, giving you a drop-shackle setup. However, you'll want to lift the front as well if you are going to do this. Ride quality is improved, and the increase in articulation is amazing.

Previously, the hot swap was Ranger springs; they are longer than stock but shorter than Chevy's. And before that was Mazda springs, which required a bit of mixing and matching of various spring packs.

Hth!


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Greg Sue
85 Toyota X-cab
http://media-north.com/4wd/
 

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Had my rear leafs re-arched and an additional leaf put in last spring on my stock 92'pickup, happy with it so far. But I,ve been told that in time they will sag again. It was the cheapest option for now, and gave quite a lift to the old back end. The ride became slightly more bouncy after and the travel for the emergency brake handle was reduced.Good Luck !
 

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my rear end sags. i was wondering how much lift the chevy springs give u. i would like to get rid of my lift blocks and have a leval ride. i have about 4-5" lift in the front. and 3" or 4" blocks in the rear.i am puting in a small block chevy so the front will lower a bit from the weight. also hav much work is it and what springs do i use? thanks

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85 toyota 7" lift 35s, Rolled grad camping 3 days after I painted it
 
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