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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all,

I have had this little shimmy in my steering for while now, comes in around 60km/h or so. Just had both my kingpin bearing/seals replaced and I seem to be noticing it a little more now, (maybe less play with the new stuff?) Not so severe but annoying. Just the wheel pulling side to side. I notice the effect is stonger the lower I go in Psi, and milder with higher psi. Seems to track straight with no real pull to either side.

I run a low perch spoa with 31x10.5 m/t. The steering setup is a drop pitman and a drop z link. Stabilizer is attached to the pitman. I suppose a good first start would be to have the wheels rotated and balanced? I am sure I probably wiped any balance weights off the rims long ago.

But is there a need to have a steering alignment, as is castor, toe-in etc. I don't recall hearing anyone talk of it before in regards to sammys. Pardon if this is newbie type question. Just trying to track down this little shimmy... shimmy shimmy ya! Anyone else tackle something similar?

jack funk
(burnaby boy)

[This message has been edited by jackfunk (edited November 25, 2001).]
 

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Just a thought but try moving the front tires to the back and the back tires to the front see if the shimmy moves as well, I`m thinking it could be a bad belt in a tire hope this works for you.
 

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Check your shackle bolts,

I had the same problem and it was over tightened shackle bolts. The other things that will cause this problem are: different toe settings on each front tire, excessive toe in, uneven tire pressure, unbalanced tires, and believe it or not I've heard of a sticking caliper causing a similar problem.

David

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
hey there,

thanks for the advice, just got out there and rotated the tires front to back. Removed my swaybar and bumbstops as well while I was at it. Besides the bumbsteer wobble that happens, the shimmy is a little reduced. I will check those shackle bolts.. how loose should they be? Also I will probably have my tires balanced as well.

About the toe in? Is that something I can do, or am i better off going to an alignment shop? Thanks again guys.
 

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Originally posted by jackfunk:
hey there,

thanks for the advice, just got out there and rotated the tires front to back. Removed my swaybar and bumbstops as well while I was at it. Besides the bumbsteer wobble that happens, the shimmy is a little reduced. I will check those shackle bolts.. how loose should they be? Also I will probably have my tires balanced as well.

About the toe in? Is that something I can do, or am i better off going to an alignment shop? Thanks again guys.
Don't know the torque specs for the shackle bolts off hand... most libraries carry the haynes manual, you can pick the info. up from there.

A good alignment shop is worth it's weight in gold. On Sami's only toe is adjustable, so it should be inexpensive to do. Get a quote first, if you're really rusted up they may try to ding ya extra for dealing with "rusted parts". If ya got in an accident or hit something hard it's also possible that the shock travelled up to your steering column and bent that.

Interesting that you mentioned removing the sway bar helped, in my situation it actually made it worse... go figure, eh?

David


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just realized I didn't actually answer the question you asked... hehehe

A "backyard alignment" is possible to do... search that phrase on the web and you should find a lot of pages from amateur racers telling you how to do one.

Toe is the measure of whether your tire are pointing straight ahead or not. Toe in means they point in toward the center of the vehicle, toe out means they point out to the sides of the vehicle.

To do toe yourself, measure from the front inside edge of the left WHEEL to the front inside edge of the right WHEEL (try to measure wheel to wheel, not tire to tire). Compare that measure to the back inside edge of the left wheel to the back inside edge of the right wheel. If they're the same, that's zero toe (good on Sami's) if the front is more, that's toe out... if the front is less that's toe in.

The problem with this method is it assumes that both wheels are "equal" if one wheel is "out" more than the other, this method will not detect it. I'll leave it to those webpages mentioned to give you a better way of measuring toe.

FYI camber is a measure of the vertical plane of the tire. Negative camber means the tire tilts IN at the top. Positive camber means the tire tilts OUT at the top. You want Zero or a little negative camber in a sami.

Caster I can never describe properly, so I won't try :*)

David

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I came, I saw, I stuck around.
 

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Caster is the relation of the upper and lower mounting points of the spindle,ie ball joints or king pins. Positive caster is when the upper mounting location is further rearward than the lower. Negative caster is the opposite. On a solid front axle one wheel can not be more out toe wise than another. On a solid axle only total toe is measured.

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Doing an allignment on something where only the toe is adjustable isn't really any cheaper because most of the time is spent hooking it up, checking tire pressure, doing runouts and a caster sweep, and centering the wheel. The actual adjustment time doesn't take nearly as much.

If you want to set toe at home, use a tape measure at the front and rear of the tire, and compare the differance. You must use the same point on the sidewall to measure from, and the point also must be the same height from the ground at the front and back of the tire. For most vehicles just shoot for 1/8" toe in (front measures shorter than rear distance). The big problem is that this really isn't too accurate, and will not show you any other problems. It's nice to get it in the shop and see what the caster/camber and setback are at, incase something (ie housing) has been bent at some point. Allignements are usually pretty reasonable, and make sure you ask for a printout to keep, as if there is any problems it's a lot easier to correct once you know what it was at before.

Anyways, hope that helps...

Ryan Gates
92 Sidekick (one more month until it get parked for two years)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all info guys! I think it will be best if I take my sammy into a shop for that alignment, then later I can read up at my leisure about home adjustment.

Are there any shops folks would recommend, or any that I should avoid? I suppose I will just look for a reputable alignment shop? Any in town that you might suggest?
 
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