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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a 85 toyota ext-cab 4x4. It was sitting for 1 yr when I bought it...When i put it in reverse it feels like the brakes are still on but not when going forward but it still sticks in forwrd a bit. Is it the e brake that is stuck or the wheel cylinders?

Also, there is a swinging arm on the rear diff....what is that for? It is supposed to be attached to a steel rod that goes to some kind of junction box bolted on the frame. THe box has brake lines goign into it. What is that for? Anyways the rod on mine looks like it broke off and it is not attached to the swing arm on the diff anymore. Any info on this would be appreciated.

Cheers
Ryan:confused:
 

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Ruggles said:
I just bought a 85 toyota ext-cab 4x4. It was sitting for 1 yr when I bought it...When i put it in reverse it feels like the brakes are still on but not when going forward but it still sticks in forwrd a bit. Is it the e brake that is stuck or the wheel cylinders?

Also, there is a swinging arm on the rear diff....what is that for? It is supposed to be attached to a steel rod that goes to some kind of junction box bolted on the frame. THe box has brake lines goign into it. What is that for? Anyways the rod on mine looks like it broke off and it is not attached to the swing arm on the diff anymore. Any info on this would be appreciated.

I believe that's a "load sensing" arm. Basically, if you have a heavy load in your box, it gives you more rear brake bias.

BTW, I often had to adjust the parking brakes on my '84 Toy because the cylinders tended to tighten up which resulted in the symptoms your describe. Then when I got my Jeep YJ, they tended to loosen off. So far my Scout axles seem to be ok. :soso

...lars



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Chump
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Also the sticking brakes can be caused by the e-brake arm levers that go into the drum sticking. They are made of aluminum and steel which causes them to corrode quite badly (galvanic dissimilarity). This can sometimes cause the e-brake not to release properly.

MIne were so bad they basically disintegrated in the vise while trying to tear them down. So I decided to make new ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for the help guys. I'll chack those things out and hopefully I'll have a little more power to play with....heh heh....wishful thinking....I also just put in a K&N filter but I haven't drivien it yet. Maybe that will give me a little more juice.
Ryan
 

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You don't really need to have the load sensing arm hooked up, just make sure your rear brakes are properly adjusted.
 

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those are pretty good looking brake arm levers there Jordan. Would you be interesting in selling me pair? Mine are all rusted to s**t like all the other older Toy's out there.
 

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dagoat said:
those are pretty good looking brake arm levers there Jordan. Would you be interesting in selling me pair? Mine are all rusted to s**t like all the other older Toy's out there.
OK, I will just add it to the list of the 18,000 other pieces I want to make and sell :p

Once I run out of pornography to look at on the internet I will be making all sorts of neat stuff for Toyota trucks. :*******
 

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Jordan said:
They are made of aluminum and steel which causes them to corrode quite badly (galvanic dissimilarity).
Those words couldn't have been sweeter if they came from the mouth of Luigi Galvani himself.

My ebrake wouldn't move a while back but I could pound it into the engaged position with a hammer and then it would not release again.

Since Jordan won't have any of those pretty little units for sale for a little while, there's always plan B: remove the whole mechanism, drill out the bolt that the lever pivots on if you can't get it out otherwise, clean both parts and do whatever is necessary to create more clearance between the 2 (I grinded a little off each side of the lever), heavily grease between the 2 parts, put in a new bolt, slide the boot back on, re-install. I don't know how often it would need to be maintained but mine went from useless to fully functional and it's lasted 6 months so far without any concern.
 
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