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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so, in my limited ham experience i've only used the vhf band. i'm looking to get a new radio for the truck and am trying to decide if its worth the extra $ to go dual band. it looks like there's a good chunk of repeaters on uhf, but i've never used the band at all.

wondering if any of you guys have used uhf repeaters, or have used uhf frequencies for simplex? and if so would it be worth my hard earned dollars to get on the band?

any input would be muchly appreciated!

cheers,
-mike.
 

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If you don't use it now and don't see a need too... don't spend the money. UHF has its uses, but is that your uses? APRS is neat though if you get an APRS equipped radio.
 

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I got a dual band radio, only because I got a good deal on it. I have used the UHF a couple of times but mostly just for fun. I would say VHF will be all you will need for wheelin. The range and clarity are awesome and with a mobile rig mounted in your vehicle and a good antenna you can pump out the power. I've used mine all over the coast and am virtually always in contact with someone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah those are the kind of responses I was expecting. Thinking I may join the ranks of ic-2200h's, i've heard nothing but good things about those radios. Save my $ for other adventures.

You're right Wes, APRS is a sick technology, and i would like to get into that one day, but i do alot of hiking and ski touring so i'd rather be hand-held based for that (albiet lower powered).

Anyway, thanks for the input guys!
 

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I have a 2200, its a decent radio, but not what I would call user friendly... The Yaesu competitors are a bit more user friendly and a few less dollars. Though you can't really go wrong with an Icom, Yaesu or Kenwood.
 

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I have a 2200, its a decent radio, but not what I would call user friendly... The Yaesu competitors are a bit more user friendly and a few less dollars. Though you can't really go wrong with an Icom, Yaesu or Kenwood.
I agree with Wes on that. I've typically always used Icom radios just because thats about the standard with the trucking industry, but for the money I've been more impressed with the few Yaesu's that I've used. Icom is fine if you know them intimately, but even my 2100 I have messed up a couple of times because I don't know it well enough and just guessed in the field when changing settings. LR
 

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Ok a good dual band if it will cross band repeat is worth its weight in gold!

Think of it this way yer out hiking back country no cell but nice dual band portable ht. in yer vehicle is yer dual band on and set up for x band repeater....u get hurt..call out on ht truck repeaters that to a known amteur repeater some one responds truck repeats to u. Just a thought..... consider, it does require all the right gear but its doable.

And best of all having checked with IC is 100% legit, legal, ok to do.

I use exclusively Yeasu and am very pleased with my gear btw.
 

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Yeah those are the kind of responses I was expecting. Thinking I may join the ranks of ic-2200h's, i've heard nothing but good things about those radios. Save my $ for other adventures.

You're right Wes, APRS is a sick technology, and i would like to get into that one day, but i do alot of hiking and ski touring so i'd rather be hand-held based for that (albiet lower powered).

Anyway, thanks for the input guys!
You can be mobile-ish with UHF and aprs. A couple years ago, i built some software that listened to an APRS transmitter on a serial port, and then pushed that data into a mapping engine for GIS stuff. One proof of concept we did, was have a guy with an backpack mounted antenna go for a walk after driving 50k outside of any cell range. We were able to show him on the web as he went for a hike, was very cool...
 

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You can be mobile-ish with UHF and aprs. A couple years ago, i built some software that listened to an APRS transmitter on a serial port, and then pushed that data into a mapping engine for GIS stuff. One proof of concept we did, was have a guy with an backpack mounted antenna go for a walk after driving 50k outside of any cell range. We were able to show him on the web as he went for a hike, was very cool...
New to the area my self, are there any APRS repeaters up here?

Also a dual Band mobile Radio that has Cross Band Repeat is useful as it allows you to use your HT (Hand Held) radio at a great distance from your vehicle and use the full power of the mobile and its antenna to reach a repeater or perhaps a base station. i have used such a set up many times to allow a group to communicate over a large area by parking on a a hill top. there are many possibilities, you get the idea.

73, de KE6ENI / VE7
 

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Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) [1]is an amateur radio-based system for real time tactical digital communications of information of immediate value in the local area. In addition, all such data is ingested into the APRS Internet system (APRS-IS) and distributed globally for ubiquitous and immediate access. Along with messages, alerts, announcements and bulletins, the most visible aspect of APRS is its map display. Anyone may place any object or information on his or her map, and it is distributed to all maps of all users in the local RF network or monitoring the area via the Internet. Any station, radio or object that has an attached GPS is automatically tracked. Other prominent map features are weather stations, alerts and objects and other map-related amateur radio volunteer activities including Search and Rescue and signal direction finding.

APRS has been developed since the late 1980s by Bob Bruninga, callsign WB4APR, currently a senior research engineer at the United States Naval Academy. He still maintains the main APRS website. The acronym "APRS" was derived from his callsign.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well since my last post in January, I did decide to get a dual band for the truck.. ended up with a yaesu ftm-10r. Although it does not have APRS or cross-band repeating capailities, its been a great radio for me so far (apart from a low-hanging branch completely destroying my antenna & mount at one point).

In my travels was able to hit UHF repeaters in Edgewood/Nakusp, Kamloops and also in Kelowna.. so I would say UHF has been useful.
 

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Well since my last post in January, I did decide to get a dual band for the truck.. ended up with a yaesu ftm-10r. Although it does not have APRS or cross-band repeating capailities, its been a great radio for me so far (apart from a low-hanging branch completely destroying my antenna & mount at one point).

In my travels was able to hit UHF repeaters in Edgewood/Nakusp, Kamloops and also in Kelowna.. so I would say UHF has been useful.
As you say you didn't opt for those other handy feautures, but that is a very nice radio and fairs well in wet weather handy in a open vechicle. give me a freq, you use and and a time and ill catch you on the radio.
73,de KE6ENI / VE7
 

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Ahh, my bad Baja_Dave, I got APRS confused with GMRS.
Noooooooo Problem bud, Ham is what i would recomend any time over any type of communications it always works and there is always some one there to hear your call, you may listen to a reapeater for hours and hear not a peep out of your speaker, but there out there Listening.
GMRS is useful as well and Citizens band too they all have there application, but i encourage people to get there ham ticket, pretty easy these days no morese code anymore, and you can practice the test online till you have it down, then go for your test while its fresh. some say this is not the best way to pass the test but i say what ever works and gets people licensed, once on the air and rubbing elbows with other long time licensed hams who are activly involved in the hobby you will pick it up as you go along. Myself i love doing HF mobile and talking to hams all over the world from behind the wheel.

Attached is a photo of my High Sierra motorized mobile HF antenna on the back of my Bronco in Mexico in the fully extended 3.5 Mhz 80 Meter Position.

73 de KE6ENI / VE7
 

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Noooooooo Problem bud, Ham is what i would recomend any time over any type of communications it always works and there is always some one there to hear your call, you may listen to a reapeater for hours and hear not a peep out of your speaker, but there out there Listening.
GMRS is useful as well and Citizens band too they all have there application, but i encourage people to get there ham ticket, pretty easy these days no morese code anymore, and you can practice the test online till you have it down, then go for your test while its fresh. some say this is not the best way to pass the test but i say what ever works and gets people licensed, once on the air and rubbing elbows with other long time licensed hams who are activly involved in the hobby you will pick it up as you go along. Myself i love doing HF mobile and talking to hams all over the world from behind the wheel.

Attached is a photo of my High Sierra motorized mobile HF antenna on the back of my Bronco in Mexico in the fully extended 3.5 Mhz 80 Meter Position.

73 de KE6ENI / VE7
do you have the links to the resources that you recommend?
i'm really interested in getting my license soon and want to get a jump on it

cheers
 

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Try these:

www.rac.ca
http://www.langleyamateurradio.com/
http://www.ve7sar.net/

RAC is Radio Amateurs of Canada. They are the national group responsible for amateur radio in Canada. I suggest getting a copy of their study book for the basic exam. https://www.coaxpublications.ca/ord0001r.php

Unfortunately, you have to study up on a lot of things you will likely never use in operating your radio. The upside is that you can forget it all once you are licensed. That's when you will want to spend some time with other hams to learn how to actually OPERATE the radio.

The links to the Langley and Surrey amateur radio clubs are there because those are some people close to you who can give you pointers on operating. They also likely have a certified examiner who can administer your exam. 100 multiple choice questions - 70 is a pass, 80+ and you have HF privileges.

Good luck!
 

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awesome thanks!
 

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That's pretty sweet that you can get on the 80 meter band from your truck! it's amazing what antennas can do
That is a nice antenna i have, this type of antenna is comonly refered to a screwdriver antenna, because one of the original "home brew" versions was powered with an early electric screwdriver.

There are a few different brands, High Sierra is what i use. just google to see the other ones avaiable. I have one on the back of the motorhome as well you can see it here http://www.qrz.com/db/KE6ENI
 
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