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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Custom axles shafts?

I have acquired a full floating Sidekick/Samurai Hybrid rear end (same as the spidertrax one).

The only problem is that i have no axleshafts for it. So who in the lower mainland can i get to make them?? Is it possible to have it done by any machinist if we have the measurements?

Also what are your thoughts on using rear Dana 60 axles(happen to be lying around) Cutting them, tapering them down to fit the hubs and gears and getting them resplined and hardened. Is there any advantages/disadvantages to this?

Any other ideas on what to do?

Not sure if this is techy enough so feel free to move it wherever O ruthless moderator.

Rhys
 

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Ya but once you get your custom axleshafts made, what are you going to do for spares out on the trail?




:D
 

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Big Bad Pete said:
Ya but once you get your custom axleshafts made, what are you going to do for spares out on the trail?

:D
It's a Suzuki, he isn't going to need spares:mullet

If you can't find anyone in Vancouver, Rhys I can give you a contact in Washington state that does them for a reasonable price.
 

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Axle shafts are hardened steel; you can't just put them in any old lathe and remove the extra material. Special cutting bits are required, both for trimming the shaft down and for making the new splines.

There's no advantage to starting with a D60 shaft if the finished product is a lot smaller - you might as well use something that's only a little bigger than what you need, like maybe D44?

I've had reasonably good luck with Moser (www.moserengineering.com) in the states, though Dutchman can also do this kind of work. I don't know of anyone locally with the equipment to do this kind of thing right.

Chris
 

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cwate said:
Axle shafts are hardened steel; you can't just put them in any old lathe and remove the extra material. Special cutting bits are required, both for trimming the shaft down and for making the new splines.
Chris
Sorry Chris but you dont know what your talkin about. We used to take axles down at the tool shop and im talkin Strange axles. Yes it's very hard steel but if you know your lathework it's not a problem. Splines are different , i agree, you need a broaching machine to do that but as far as axles go, any ole lathe WILL DO IF YOU KNOW HOW TO DO IT ! :D
 

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axleshafts?

Theres a shop called Delta Dynamic (in delta) that cut the splines for my front axleshafts on the sidekick. They cut them on a hobber, and had a bit that closely matched the profile of the splines on the front side gears. Not sure if they have one that will match the rears. I would recomend doing two pairs of shafts while your at it. Doesn't cost must more once the machines are setup to do another couple shafts. Same with heat treatment, not much more cost for four than two.

Would it not be cheaper to buy the axleshafts from spidertrax, or will they only sell the full assembly?

As far as turning the shafts down to size, it all depends on how herdened the outer case is. It might be very difficult to cut (breaking bits, etc) or could be soft enough to not be a prob. When we turned the suzuki front shafts, they weren't extremely hard, so it was doable with just a normal carbide bit.

If you can figure out what diameters you need cut I'm sure most machine shops will be able to handle it. This will all add up to quite a lot of $$ in labor though!

Hope that helps,

Ryan Gates
92 Sidekick
 

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I agree with Kicker 92, Delta Dynamics has hobbing machines available to perform this type of work, you also might want to try Pullmaster in Surrey, or Vancouver Gear in Richmond (off of 6 Road). If anyone needs to see how hard the shafts are I can measure the hardness for them, in various scales like HRC/B/A, whatever...

As for turning down a hardened material, it all depends on the type and style of insert you are using, for extremely hard shafts you may need to use a ceramic insert, but you would be surprised what can be done with carbide Sandvik/Kennametal inserts if the right guy is running the machine.

Just my 2 cents!

Matt:canadian
 

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We've used Marksman Machining and Fabricating out of Mission more than once to shorten and repspline Ford 9" axleshafts for drag racing aplications.

It was pretty expensive though.
 
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