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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Jeepers.

I finally got around to taking a look at this old Jeep that is sitting out back of work. I`m not sure who owns it, and no-one seems to know right now, but it is interesting.
I don`t know much about Jeeps, except that some poeple say the name came from "general purpose", and other`s swear that when they first came out for the war, they were called GPW`s which meant Government Pigmy Willys. I don`t even want to know where the pigmy part came from, sounds dumb, but I`m a Ford man, and I`ll let you guys figure it out.

Back to the Jeep in question;

It appears to be a 1965 Jeep CJ5. Someone bolted and welded there own roof to it, which is sad, but the frame looks solid and may have been restored and painted when the top was done.

The main question I have is there seemes to be two levers coming from the transfer case. Any description is long since faded, so I was wondering what kind of a TC these things came with, and what do the shifters do? my guess is maybe one shifts into 4 or 2 wheel drive, and the other selects lo or hi (?)

Also I have found a site that says there were 50,000 of these made which seems like a low number. Are they rare?

This same site said that CJ stands for "Civilian Jeep" so what the heck does YJ or TJ stand for then?

Oh yeah, if Chrysler merged with Daimler, doesn`t that make Jeeps owned by a German company? Is that Ironic or what?
 

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Its a twin stick tcase

I think this is it 2lo neutral 2 hi for the first

and 4lo neutral 4hi for the second

I could be wrong
 

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I don`t know much about Jeeps, except that some poeple say the name came from "general purpose", and other`s swear that when they first came out for the war, they were called GPW`s which meant Government Pigmy Willys. I don`t even want to know where the pigmy part came from, sounds dumb, but I`m a Ford man, and I`ll let you guys figure it out.


There's several theories on where the word "Jeep" came from.

GPW was the Ford-built WWII version, the letters standing for General Purpose, Willys-style.

"Pygmy" was Ford's entry to win the contract to build Jeeps. Ford lost to Willys, but got a contract to build some Jeeps (the GPW) too, since Willys couldn't keep up with the demand.


The main question I have is there seemes to be two levers coming from the transfer case. Any description is long since faded, so I was wondering what kind of a TC these things came with, and what do the shifters do? my guess is maybe one shifts into 4 or 2 wheel drive, and the other selects lo or hi (?)


It's a Dana 18 for your year Jeep, and you're on the money for how it works.


Also I have found a site that says there were 50,000 of these made which seems like a low number. Are they rare?


Depends upon your definition of rare. However, just like old pickups, the older they are, the more of a coolness factor they have.


This same site said that CJ stands for "Civilian Jeep" so what the heck does YJ or TJ stand for then?


Nothing, specifically (although, you will get some opinions, like "Yuppie Jeep" and "Trail Jeep"). You know how GM refers to cars as "A-body", "G-body", stuff like that; and Ford has its "Fox-body" and "compact platform" cars? It's a similar thing. All Jeep products are a somethingJ.


Oh yeah, if Chrysler merged with Daimler, doesn`t that make Jeeps owned by a German company? Is that Ironic or what?


Bigtime. <g>
 

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ld50 said:
...
This same site said that CJ stands for "Civilian Jeep" so what the heck does YJ or TJ stand for then?
...
The most reasonable theory I've heard of the Jeep name is that all military light trucks without an assigned use (eg - ambulance) were called GP for general purpose, and it got slurred it to "jeep". A newpaper reporter heard GP pronounced "jeep" and printed it the way we spell it now.
When willys/overland started producing civilian vehicles they "stole" the Jeep name. In one theory Ford should have had rights to the name because they actually produced more GP units. On the other hand Bantam originally designed the thing.
 

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Actually it does not stand for "General Purpose" but "Government Pattern". IE: The flat front lorries built by Ford and Chevrolet that were used during that conflict were called CMP or "Candian Military Pattern".
The Military would set forth requirements and the manufactures would submit their version of that 'pattern'.
CMP never got a 'nickname' but GP was easy in an era that gave us SNAFU, and FUBAR to name a few ;-)
 

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Also of interest is that "Jeep" in this spelling, capitalized was first used for a 1936 Ford-Marmon-Harrington half-tarck used by the Royal Canadian Artillery. See it here:
http://bcoy1cpb.pacdat.net/The_Jeep_1937_Shilo.jpg

The vehicle we have come to know as the 'real' Jeep was officially known as 'Car 5 cwt.' by Commonwealth armies (as well as 'W-LU 440-M-PERS-1' in Canada), 'Truck 1/4 ton Command and Reconnaissance' by the US (that's a mouthfull!) and known to the public and soldiers as 'Blitz Buggy', 'Peep' and of course 'jeep'.
 

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sparrow said:
Actually it does not stand for "General Purpose" but "Government Pattern".
I've read tons of books about Jeeps and watched a few documentaries but I've never heard that version of the name before... Where did you get that? "General Purpose" seems to be the most popular version but I don't know if that's correct.

Here's yet another theory on the Jeep name
 

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Where did you get that?

Military history and not Jeep history.
Other examples are:
MCP (Modified Conventional Pattern), SMP (Standard Military Pattern) , GPA (Amphibious), GPW (Willys?), etc.
Note that these vehicles were not called "general purpose" but '1/4 tons' and once fully in production 'command and reconnaissance' .
The other theory is that the 'P' is code indicating an 80 inch wheelbase while the 'G' indicates 'Government'. I don't really buy into this one simply because of all the other 'P' vehicles and even variants that certainly do not have an 80 inch wheelbase.
I do know for a fact that "General Purpose' is a myth. Even the site you sent a link to discredits that in it's conclusion!
 

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The GPA... the amphibious version of the Ford GPW.. the ones built by Ford to the Willys patterns were also nicknamed "Seeps"
I always thought they were Cool and I would LOVE to eventually own one.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Lots of interesting replies, Jeep seems to have a shady past!

In the industry I work in I have come across another thing with the name "Jeep"

It is an extra axle used with tractor-trailer/ semi-trailer trucks. It is used when heavy loads are being hauled, to distribute the weight over more tires. it is basically an axle that connects to the tractor pin, and the trailer connects to another pin on that. I cant recall the actual name of it, but truckers always just call it a "jeep"

We also have something called a "pipe GEEP" which detects flaws in the protective wrapping around a pipeline.

I found a site that also said "willys" was originally pronounced "Will-iss" but everyone says "Will-ees" now, even though the man who was named that would not appreciate it!

Oh yeah, that Ford "pygmy" actually looked alright, but very similiar to the Jeep, wouldn`t you say?
I read that the companies who submitted prototypes to the army did alot of work together to design them, so their submissions were alot alike.
 

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Actually the reason they look the same is because they were built to 'GP' specs or 'Government Pattern'.
Here is the 'pattern':

It must have a load capacity of 600 pounds
The wheelbase must be under 75 inches (not sure if this is a typo)
The height must be under 36 inches
The engine must run smoothly from three to fifty miles per hour
It must have a rectangular shaped body
It must have a two speed transfer case with four wheel drive
It must have a windshield that folds down
It must include three bucket seats
It must have blackout and driving lights
Gross vehicle weight must be under 1200 pounds

I think, however, we can be pretty sure that the 'GP' has no bearing on the nicknaming of 'jeep' and like I said before the first documented use of 'Jeep' in capitalized form was in 1936 by the RCA.
 

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Did you know that the front diff cover that has been used since 1939 ( even on Bantam's first Prototype) the Dana 25 will fit perfectly on even a brand new TJ Dana30...
talk about a long standing design...
BTW the Dana 25 was first used as a rear axle for a Studebaker application.

Another Jeep little known fact... Barney Roos the designer of the winning bid (willys) used a ping pong paddle to determine the curve of the rear quarter panel... apparently he was working on such a tight schedule that he took all the plans home at night and would work on them in the rec-room..........:)
 
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