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In my opinion it seems like a logical place to put a locker. I like mud. I drive mud a lot. As a result, a locker up front rather than the rear is much better. All the weight is up front, thats where all the traction is (if u have any at all) and so that's where I want my locker. Also up front as far as I can tell there is abseloutly NO on road side effects with a locker up front. So why is everyone telling me I am stupid? Everyone has said to me "don't put it up front Doug, you are a fool". I need one person to give me a solid reason as to why I am making a mistake. Don't say its because when you are facing up a wet hill you need the locker in back. I don't care about that, as I said befor I like mud.

Thank you for your help
 

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Superfly
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Put them front and rear...you won't regret it.
 

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because especialy when your mud slangin' if you slightly hit a rock or turn your wheels at the wrong time your axles can shatter. i'v seen it done.

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How many of those people saying you are stupid have mechanical knowledge and actually wheel hard? There are pros & cons of locking either end.

The main reasons front lockers are frowned on are: (not all may apply to you)
1- loss of steering on ice. The locker needs a certain amount of resistance to unlock and allow the tires to turn at different speeds for cornering. On ice you often don't have that much traction, so your front end "pushes" instead of turning.
2- Jumpy steering. The locker engages and releases as you corner casusing jumping and clanging. This was a problem with the original Detroit Locker, but the new design Detroit and many other new tech lockers don't have this problem nearly as bad. There's even one that has a retainer that holds the locker in the released position until you straighten your tires again (but more complexity = less strength).
3- hard to steer. A front locker on high traction rock can make it very hard to steer and can wear out a power steering pump fast. There are upgraded pumps you can buy if needed. Again, this is not as big a problem as it used to be. You can also bend tie-rods this way.
4- blown U-joints or axle shafts. Go nose down into a ditch or into another situation where you put a lot of weight or momentum and all your traction on one front tire and you can create some carnage. In general front axles are not as strong as back axles (unless you have a Jeep with a 35C rear
).
5- side slipping. When off camber with an unlocked front end the tire without power acts as an anchor and helps keep you moving forward. Spin both front tires and you loose traction and turn downhill.
6- as you mentioned, on steep climbs the weight is on the rear so it makes sense to put the locker there.

On the other hand:
- when negotiating stair-steps sometimes is not possible to climb it at all if both front tires are not powered.
- Having both front tires powered can help you correct if you get squirly at high speed.
- A front locker can pull you out of ruts you would be stuck in otherwise.
- The Jeep D35C rear (for those of us that have it) is a useless POS, so why spend money putting a locker in it just to break the axle and replace it later anyway.

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Chris S.
2002 KJ - staying stock (almost)
2000 TJ - 2" suspension lift, 1/2" body lift, assorted skids, hooks, rock rails, rock lights, 33" BFG MTs, custom bumper, Warn 8274
Mud Puppy's Jeep site
 

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My first locker was a lockrite that I put in the front. For most rockcrawling, I will agree that you get better effects with having it in the rear, since most sections are uphill where the weight is in the back.
The "side effects" as far as I'm concerned were not very noticable. Yeah, the steering was a bit harder in 4 wheel drive.

Bottom line is this: If you wheel it, a locker is always better than no locker.
I'm not big on mud, but I think putting a locker up front from what you say makes sense.

Like Wil says, if you can put them in both ends, it's even better. No matter which end you put it in, the difference in traction and how far you can get will be like day & night.
 

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simple logic says that at the very least dont put one in the front unless you are part time and can unlock the hubs. if your are a yj with D30 front that has no manual locking hubs(or any ability to unlock them at all other than blowing the u-joint
) or a cherokee that is the same axle dont put a locker becuase that would just be insanely annoying to drive on pavement plus you will break things.

im not going any farther then that. if you have strong parts between your carb and tires id say put it in the back so you can go impress the girls by doing big smoke shows


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-'85 XJ,2dr,4cyl,5spd,31x10.5's,2"lift,onboard air,bla,bla,bla,
-'82 J-10 Project truck, 258 straight 6, 5spd, 30x9.5's
"its not what you drive, or where you drive,
its driving what you have to where you want to go"
 

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if your are a yj with D30 front that has no manual locking hubs(or any ability to unlock them at all other than blowing the u-joint ) or a cherokee that is the same axle dont put a locker becuase that would just be insanely annoying to drive on pavement plus you will break things
I disagree. I had my front lockrite in the stock dana 30, and I could barely feel the difference on the pavement. I think it was mostly me wanting to feel something than actually feeling it.

It's not like you drive in 4 wheel drive on dry pavement. In any case, it was most defenetly NOT annoying to drive with the front locker. Like I said, I barely felt it, except when in 4 wheel drive, and the feeling there was that of pure joy watching myself crawl through obstacles I couldn't have done before.

You're not gonna be breaking things as a result because you're not applying much power to it in 2 wheel drive. Slightly more wear & tear I suppose, but not to the point where you're gonna start going through a u-joint after couple of months from driving on the road. Had mine for a little over a year - daily driver - never had a problem because of it.
 

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Superfly
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simple logic says that at the very least dont put one in the front unless you are part time and can unlock the hubs. if your are a yj with D30 front that has no manual locking hubs(or any ability to unlock them at all other than blowing the u-joint ) or a cherokee that is the same axle dont put a locker becuase that would just be insanely annoying to drive on pavement plus you will break things.
If you have an axle disconnect in the front (most YJs do but I can't remember if the '95's did or not), an auto locker such as a the Lockright, etc should be unnoticable. The connected shaft (driver's side) and the disconnected shaft (passenger's side) will be locked together all the time so there will be no locker effect whatsoever.

...lars

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Originally posted by Chris S:
4- In general front axles are not as strong as back axles (unless you have a Jeep with a 35C rear
).
What exactly is a 35c? I assume a Dana 35 with c-clips, is that correct? What exactly is that (c-clips--if I even have that right)? Would I have one in my '92 YJ?


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The C on a Jeep 35C actually stands for "custom" because they were designed for Jeep.

yes, your YJ has a 35C axle.

The problem with C-clips is that if you break an axle there is nothing keeping your tire and your Jeep attached to each other. D44 and many other axles have a mounting flange at the outer bearings that hold everything in place even if the inside of your axle is shrapnel.

The problem with the Jeep D35C is that it is not designed for big tires and lockers. Aside from just basic strength issues, the tubes are too weak so they flex and bend, resulting in carnage inside the axle, at which point you and your tire go seperate ways.

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Chris S.
2002 KJ - staying stock (almost)
2000 TJ - 2" suspension lift, 1/2" body lift, assorted skids, hooks, rock rails, rock lights, 33" BFG MTs, custom bumper, Warn 8274
Mud Puppy's Jeep site

[This message has been edited by Chris S (edited October 11, 2001).]
 

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All Dana 35 axles are C-clip, but the C on a jeep 35C actually stands for "custom" because they were designed for Jeep.
Not all dana 35's use c-clips. I think they started after '89. For sure they didn't have them in '87 and back.

I thought the "C" stood for "crap"
 

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Superfly
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Dana 35C = Dana 35 custom. It doesn't necessarily mean it has c-clips.

C-clips are not, by design, necessarily a weak axle. Toyota Land Cruisers seem to do ok with them. The Dana 35, however, is a bad axle no matter what it uses to retain the axle shafts. As far as axle breakage goes, I'm not sure if I'd want to try driving out of a trail with a broken semi-floating axle, either.

...lars

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